Calories in Meat - Beef, Lamb, and Pork

Meat comprises water, protein, fat and various amounts of minerals and vitamins. The protein is located in the muscle tissue, and constitutes from 15% to 20% of the mass of meat.

There are no carbohydrates in meat!

Beef Calories and Nutrients

Per 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of meat

Cut Calories Protein
(g)
Total Fat
(g)
Sat. Fat
(g)
Beef (top sirloin, separable lean and fat, trimmed to 1/8" fat, choice, pan-fried) 313 28.77 21.06 8.18
Beef (chuck, clod steak, separable lean and fat, trimmed to 1/4" fat, all grades, braised) 272 26.19 17.73 6.699
Beef (ground, 95% lean meat / 5% fat, crumbles, pan-browned) 193 29.17 1.34 3.441
Beef (ground, 95% lean meat / 5% fat, patty, pan-broiled) 164 25.8 5.94 2.698
Beef (round, tip round, separable lean only, trimmed to 0" fat, choice, roasted) 176 27.68 6.42 2.288

More beef cuts...

Lamb Calories

Per 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of meat

Cut Calories Protein
(g)
Total Fat
(g)
Sat. Fat
(g)
Lamb (New Zealand exported, frozen, leg, whole (shank and sirloin), separable lean and fat, roasted) 246 24.81 15.56 7.61
Lamb (USA domestic, leg, whole (shank and sirloin), separable lean and fat, trimmed to 1/8" fat, choice, roasted) 242 26.2 14.42 5.92
Lamb (Australian exported, fresh, leg, whole (shank and sirloin), separable lean only, trimmed to 1/8" fat, roasted) 190 27.31 8.1 3.297
Lamb (Australian exported, fresh, leg, sirloin chops, boneless, separable lean only, trimmed to 1/8" fat, broiled) 188 27.63 7.8 3.159

See all Lamb, Veal, and Game Meats.

Pork Calories

Per 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of meat

Cut Calories Protein
(g)
Total Fat
(g)
Sat. Fat
(g)
Pork (cured, bacon, broiled, pan-fried or roasted) 541 37.04 41.78 13.739
Pork (fresh, leg (ham), rump half, separable lean and fat, roasted) 252 28.88 14.28 5.25
Pork (fresh, loin, top loin (chops), boneless, separable lean only, pan-fried) 225 30.48 10.5 3.6

More Pork products and cuts...

The Difference between Red Meat and White Meat

Red, or dark meat comprises muscle-fibers called slow-twitch.

These are the muscles used for extensive activity like standing or walking, and the protein myoglobin in these muscle cells stores oxygen to produce the needed energy.

Myoglobin is richly pigmented; more myoglobin produces redder, or darker meat, as in the meat of cattle and sheep.

When cooked, the interior temperature reached alters the color of the myoglobin. Rare beef is cooked to 140° F or 60° C, leaving the red color unchanged. Above this temperature, medium-done meat becomes tan in color, until at 170° F or about 77° C, well-done meat is brown-gray.

Pork should be cooked to this well-done temperature. Pig meat has myoglobin, but young pigs (the usual source of bacon and pork) have only a low concentration, so pork is often called 'the other white meat'.

White Meat

White meat comprises muscle-fibers called fast-twitch.

Fast-twitch muscles produce quick bursts of intense activity, such as running from danger.

The energy required comes from another protein stored in the muscles, called glycogen. When raw, white meat has a translucent or glassy quality, cooking causes the proteins to recombine or coagulate, so that the meat becomes opaque and whitish.

Poultry has areas of both dark and white meat, and is recommended to cook to 180° F or 82° C. Fish has mainly white meat, and should be cooked to 165° F or 74 ° C.

We eat too much meat

While protein in meat is a great for tissue repair, many of us eat too much of it. As more of the world's population increases meat intake, the strain on our resources is not sustainable.

Take a look at some ways to manage your meat intake more wisely.

Last Updated 30 Dec 2014